we change them and we are changed
theparisreview:

The Baffler has made all of its back issues available for free online. Here are our recommendations.

theparisreview:

The Baffler has made all of its back issues available for free online. Here are our recommendations.

kateoplis:

As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading.”

Nobody Lives Here

mucholderthen:

Incredible view of Antarctica with sea ice at its maximum, in the month of September [on September 21, 2005], made from the data taken by the AMSR-E instrument, a device designed to capture temperatures and sea ice concentration onboard NASA’s Aqua satellite.

(source)

kateoplis:

One family’s photograpgs of shipwrecks - a thousand images spanning 130 years - at the Royal Museums Greenwich: The Gibson Archive

caille:

"A miner and his family, Rhondda Valley, South Wales, 22 June 1931"
Copyright James Jarche

caille:

"A miner and his family, Rhondda Valley, South Wales, 22 June 1931"

Copyright James Jarche

mpdrolet:

Silhouettes of three men in hats and a child in snow-filled landscape standing in front of “The Father of the Glaciers”, 1902
Clarence Leroy Andrews

mpdrolet:

Silhouettes of three men in hats and a child in snow-filled landscape standing in front of “The Father of the Glaciers”, 1902

Clarence Leroy Andrews

kateoplis:

The Scott Expedition is a 1,800-mile (2,900km), four-month unsupported return journey from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole on foot following [the same route that claimed the lives of Captain Robert Scott and his men a century ago]. Equivalent to 69 back-to-back marathons, the team will face temperatures as low as -50 °C and will haul sledge loads of up to 200kg each.”

Then & Now | NG & All in the Mind

kateoplis:

“Let’s go shopping. We can start at Whole Foods Market, a critical link in the wholesome-eating food chain. There are three Whole Foods stores within 15 minutes of my house—we’re big on real food in the suburbs west of Boston. Here at the largest of the three, I can choose from more than 21 types of tofu, 62 bins of organic grains and legumes, and 42 different salad greens.
Much of the food isn’t all that different from what I can get in any other supermarket, but sprinkled throughout are items that scream “wholesome.” One that catches my eye today, sitting prominently on an impulse-buy rack near the checkout counter, is Vegan Cheesy Salad Booster, from Living Intentions, whose package emphasizes the fact that the food is enhanced with spirulina, chlorella, and sea vegetables. The label also proudly lets me know that the contents are raw—no processing!—and that they don’t contain any genetically modified ingredients. What the stuff does contain, though, is more than three times the fat content per ounce as the beef patty in a Big Mac (more than two-thirds of the calories come from fat), and four times the sodium.
After my excursion to Whole Foods, I drive a few minutes to a Trader Joe’s, also known for an emphasis on wholesome foods. Here at the register I’m confronted with a large display of a snack food called “Inner Peas,” consisting of peas that are breaded in cornmeal and rice flour, fried in sunflower oil, and then sprinkled with salt. By weight, the snack has six times as much fat as it does protein, along with loads of carbohydrates. I can’t recall ever seeing anything at any fast-food restaurant that represents as big an obesogenic crime against the vegetable kingdom. (A spokesperson for Trader Joe’s said the company does not consider itself a “ ‘wholesome food’ grocery retailer.” Living Intentions did not respond to a request for comment.)”
"If the most-influential voices in our food culture today get their way, we will achieve a genuine food revolution. Too bad it would be one tailored to the dubious health fantasies of a small, elite minority. And too bad it would largely exclude the obese masses, who would continue to sicken and die early. Despite the best efforts of a small army of wholesome-food heroes, there is no reasonable scenario under which these foods could become cheap and plentiful enough to serve as the core diet for most of the obese population even in the unlikely case that your typical junk-food eater would be willing and able to break lifelong habits to embrace kale and yellow beets. And many of the dishes glorified by the wholesome-food movement are, in any case, as caloric and obesogenic as anything served in a Burger King."
How Junk Food Can End Obesity [ht/ Michael]

kateoplis:

Let’s go shopping. We can start at Whole Foods Market, a critical link in the wholesome-eating food chain. There are three Whole Foods stores within 15 minutes of my house—we’re big on real food in the suburbs west of Boston. Here at the largest of the three, I can choose from more than 21 types of tofu, 62 bins of organic grains and legumes, and 42 different salad greens.

Much of the food isn’t all that different from what I can get in any other supermarket, but sprinkled throughout are items that scream “wholesome.” One that catches my eye today, sitting prominently on an impulse-buy rack near the checkout counter, is Vegan Cheesy Salad Booster, from Living Intentions, whose package emphasizes the fact that the food is enhanced with spirulina, chlorella, and sea vegetables. The label also proudly lets me know that the contents are raw—no processing!—and that they don’t contain any genetically modified ingredients. What the stuff does contain, though, is more than three times the fat content per ounce as the beef patty in a Big Mac (more than two-thirds of the calories come from fat), and four times the sodium.

After my excursion to Whole Foods, I drive a few minutes to a Trader Joe’s, also known for an emphasis on wholesome foods. Here at the register I’m confronted with a large display of a snack food called “Inner Peas,” consisting of peas that are breaded in cornmeal and rice flour, fried in sunflower oil, and then sprinkled with salt. By weight, the snack has six times as much fat as it does protein, along with loads of carbohydrates. I can’t recall ever seeing anything at any fast-food restaurant that represents as big an obesogenic crime against the vegetable kingdom. (A spokesperson for Trader Joe’s said the company does not consider itself a “ ‘wholesome food’ grocery retailer.” Living Intentions did not respond to a request for comment.)”

"If the most-influential voices in our food culture today get their way, we will achieve a genuine food revolution. Too bad it would be one tailored to the dubious health fantasies of a small, elite minority. And too bad it would largely exclude the obese masses, who would continue to sicken and die early. Despite the best efforts of a small army of wholesome-food heroes, there is no reasonable scenario under which these foods could become cheap and plentiful enough to serve as the core diet for most of the obese population even in the unlikely case that your typical junk-food eater would be willing and able to break lifelong habits to embrace kale and yellow beets. And many of the dishes glorified by the wholesome-food movement are, in any case, as caloric and obesogenic as anything served in a Burger King."

How Junk Food Can End Obesity [ht/ Michael]

congressarchives:

This post is part of a series displaying the work of the U.S. military and veterans in honor of Veterans Day.
The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) association was established in 1899. Washington, DC, was host to the VFW convention in 1920. Cartoonist Clifford Berryman memorializes this event with his familiar character, Mr. DC, presenting the city on a platter to a veteran holding the American flag and his small valise. Sporting a large armband reading "welcome veterans," Mr. DC says to the soldier, "welcome, the city is yours."
Welcome Veterans by Clifford Berryman (6011633), 9/13/1920, U.S. Senate Collection

congressarchives:

This post is part of a series displaying the work of the U.S. military and veterans in honor of Veterans Day.

The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) association was established in 1899. Washington, DC, was host to the VFW convention in 1920. Cartoonist Clifford Berryman memorializes this event with his familiar character, Mr. DC, presenting the city on a platter to a veteran holding the American flag and his small valise. Sporting a large armband reading "welcome veterans," Mr. DC says to the soldier, "welcome, the city is yours."

Welcome Veterans by Clifford Berryman (6011633), 9/13/1920, U.S. Senate Collection